"Dancing with Dyslexia" by Aly Diane. For a larger version, go to http://alydiane.deviantart.com/

"Dancing with Dyslexia" by Aly Diane. 
For a larger version, go to http://alydiane.deviantart.com/

"Visually Communicating with Dyslexics" infographic by Katy Souders. "This is an infographic I made to go along with a research project I did on finding better techniques to visually communicate with dyslexics."
For a larger version, go to: http://grumbles87.deviantart.com/art/Visually-Communicating-with-Dyslexics-Infographic-448714009

"Visually Communicating with Dyslexics" infographic by Katy Souders. "This is an infographic I made to go along with a research project I did on finding better techniques to visually communicate with dyslexics."

For a larger version, go to: http://grumbles87.deviantart.com/art/Visually-Communicating-with-Dyslexics-Infographic-448714009

"Wheel of Apps for Learners with Dyslexia" from CALL Scotland.For a larger version, go to: http://www.callscotland.org.uk/Common-Assets/ckfinder/userfiles/files/Wheel_0f_Apps_V1_0.pdf

"Wheel of Apps for Learners with Dyslexia" from CALL Scotland.

For a larger version, go to: http://www.callscotland.org.uk/Common-Assets/ckfinder/userfiles/files/Wheel_0f_Apps_V1_0.pdf

learningally:

We need to change the SYSTEM to fit our kids with dyslexia and other learning differences, not change our kids to fit the system.

learningally:

We need to change the SYSTEM to fit our kids with dyslexia and other learning differences, not change our kids to fit the system.

When a student has dyslexia, a formal diagnosis can be very helpful because it often makes obtaining accommodations less of a struggle. But how do you get a professional diagnosis?
There are several organizations that can help. You can sometimes get your school to test your child for dyslexia. If that doesn’t work, there are several lists of independant people and organizations that may be able to help you, such as the IDA. 

http://www.interdys.org/FindAProvider.htm

When a student has dyslexia, a formal diagnosis can be very helpful because it often makes obtaining accommodations less of a struggle. But how do you get a professional diagnosis?

There are several organizations that can help. You can sometimes get your school to test your child for dyslexia. If that doesn’t work, there are several lists of independant people and organizations that may be able to help you, such as the IDA. 

http://www.interdys.org/FindAProvider.htm

Could learning to play an instrument improve school performance?http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/07/unpacking-the-science-how-playing-music-changes-the-learning-brain/?utm_source=ReadingRockets.org&utm_medium=Twitter

FluencyTutor for Google is a Chrome web app (works on Chromebook, PC, Mac) that allows teachers to share selected reading passages with their students. Students can hear the passages read aloud, and the text being read aloud is highlighted to help students follow along with the reading. 

Excellent article from Emilie Peck about comic books and the various benefits they provide to people with dyslexia.http://alternativewiring.blogspot.com/2014/07/can-comics-enhance-dyslexic-strengths.html

Excellent article from Emilie Peck about comic books and the various benefits they provide to people with dyslexia.
http://alternativewiring.blogspot.com/2014/07/can-comics-enhance-dyslexic-strengths.html

8 excellent resources for downloading free ebooks:http://mashable.com/2014/07/19/free-ebooks/?utm_cid=mash-com-Tw-main-linkRemember, when you are reading eBooks, you can change several options on your device that make the book much more dyslexic-friendly.

8 excellent resources for downloading free ebooks:
http://mashable.com/2014/07/19/free-ebooks/?utm_cid=mash-com-Tw-main-link
Remember, when you are reading eBooks, you can change several options on your device that make the book much more dyslexic-friendly.

The Kurzweil 3000-firefly is receiving about 40 updates, including support for the OpenDyslexic font. 

A beautifully written blog comparing people with dyslexia to the tough, resilient flowers that grow and bloom in the harshest of conditions.

Students - what are you passionate about? How do you find time to pursue your passions? What outlets have allowed you to learn from experts and demonstrate your proficiency? Students with dyslexia, if given the opportunity, often demonstrate spectacular talent and proficiency in an area about which they are passionate. Unfortunately, the school structure often does not allow much time for such pursuits. For example, my high school classes do not allow me to delve as deeply into computer engineering as I would prefer. I could do it on my own, but I prefer a situation in which my work is judged by professionals so that I can better gauge my progress and mastery while learning from experts in the field. Thankfully, in the case of engineering (my passion), those outlets were available. I love computer programming and developing game levels (Skyrim, etc.), but to perform those tasks I needed a more powerful computer than what I could find on the market at a reasonable price. I designed and built a high-end computer from scratch. It was fun and I learned a great deal in the process. My computer’s performance has met, and in some instances exceeded, my expectations. Tomorrow morning my computer will be reviewed and judged by engineers. I’m looking forward to hearing their comments and suggestions and learning even more from them!~ Scott Forsythe, age 17 and founder of the Dyslexic Kids support organization for children and teens with dyslexia

Students - what are you passionate about? How do you find time to pursue your passions? What outlets have allowed you to learn from experts and demonstrate your proficiency? Students with dyslexia, if given the opportunity, often demonstrate spectacular talent and proficiency in an area about which they are passionate. Unfortunately, the school structure often does not allow much time for such pursuits. 

For example, my high school classes do not allow me to delve as deeply into computer engineering as I would prefer. I could do it on my own, but I prefer a situation in which my work is judged by professionals so that I can better gauge my progress and mastery while learning from experts in the field. Thankfully, in the case of engineering (my passion), those outlets were available. I love computer programming and developing game levels (Skyrim, etc.), but to perform those tasks I needed a more powerful computer than what I could find on the market at a reasonable price. I designed and built a high-end computer from scratch. It was fun and I learned a great deal in the process. My computer’s performance has met, and in some instances exceeded, my expectations. Tomorrow morning my computer will be reviewed and judged by engineers. I’m looking forward to hearing their comments and suggestions and learning even more from them!

~ Scott Forsythe, age 17 and founder of the Dyslexic Kids support organization for children and teens with dyslexia