Several educators are trying to bring Google’s 20% time to schools.  20% time is a program Google has for its employees that allows them to spend 20% of their time on any project they want.Below is a great article on why having 20% time in schools is good for students, teachers and parents.  What do you think?http://www.edutopia.org/blog/20-percent-time-a-j-juliani

Several educators are trying to bring Google’s 20% time to schools.  20% time is a program Google has for its employees that allows them to spend 20% of their time on any project they want.

Below is a great article on why having 20% time in schools is good for students, teachers and parents.  What do you think?
http://www.edutopia.org/blog/20-percent-time-a-j-juliani

A free Google Chrome add-on called Read&Write for Google offers support for Google Docs/web to students with learning differences like dyslexia.  

Hear words, passages, or whole documents read aloud with easy-to-follow dual color highlighting, see the meaning of words explained with text and picture dictionaries, hear text translated into other languages, predicts the next word as you type, highlight interesting or relevant text and collect it for use in other documents.

It works with web pages and common file types in Google Drive, including:
- Google Docs
- PDF
- ePub
- Kes

https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/readwrite-for-google/inoeonmfapjbbkmdafoankkfajkcphgd?hl=en-US

Many people learn better with hands-on, interactive teaching, especially people with dyslexia.  That’s why Augmented Reality has such potential!  Augmented reality apps like Elements 4D are an amazing way to learn about the elements and their interactions in real time.  Be sure to watch the video!

I have a new favorite audience: the children of Camp Delafield, a camp designed specifically for students who have dyslexia, operated by+Dyslexia Institute of Indiana. I’ve had the opportunity to speak to several groups, but none compare to these bright, inquisitive young children, many of whom are newly diagnosed but optimistic and planning for an extraordinary future. All of the kids had superb questions and comments. Here are a few questions I was asked to address followed by my answers:1. What coping mechanisms help you deal with your dyslexia while in school? Answer: I’m a big fan of high tech, so I’m always on the lookout for good assistive technology. My favorite tool by far and the one I use the most is my Livescribe pen. I have trouble keeping up when I take notes in class but this pen saves me. (I then described how the pen works, and the kids were very excited about this incredible technology).2. Have you dealt with any bullying because of your dyslexia?Answer: I used to get beaten up when I was younger for being different or “stupid”, but even when I was little I knew that the problems lay in the bullies, not in me. I wasn’t stupid; they were the ones who were not informed. All that bullying made me want to help other kids and raise awareness about dyslexia. I started the Dyslexic Kids support group for children and teens with dyslexia so that we could encourage each other and remind each other that there’s nothing wrong with us. In fact, we are better than just OK. I like to say that we have a learning advantage that most public schools just aren’t advanced enough to handle!3. How or when did you learn about your dyslexia, and how did you feel? Answer: My parents had me tested when I was young, no thanks to my school (my school refused to test me until third grade) because my parents knew there was a chance I had dyslexia. My father has it, and since it’s genetic, my parents were watching for the signs. At first it seemed to me that dyslexia was a bit negative because it caused difficulty for me in school, but as I’ve gotten older I’ve discovered the really cool gifts that come with dyslexia. For example, big picture thinking, problem solving, creativity, the ability to see things differently and my talents in engineering and technology are all gifts I wouldn’t trade for the world! My father who is also dyslexic works with NASA and a huge percentage of his coworkers have dyslexia so I’ll be in good company as an engineer. Follow-up question: When and where are you going to college? Answer: I’ll be graduating from high school in two years. There are a few colleges I’m considering.4. How has your dyslexia made you a stronger person?Answer: I would never have had the courage to start a global support network if dyslexia hadn’t forced me to do it. Now, I’m comfortable with public speaking, debating, teaching, advocating for myself and others, and working with new technologies.5. How do you now spread the word for dyslexia and yourself?Answer: I host an annual dyslexia conference in Fort Wayne via the Dyslexic Kids organization. It’s the only dyslexia conference in northeast Indiana! This year the mayor will be involved and will issue a proclamation declaring the second Saturday in October to be dyslexia awareness day so that will help increase press coverage and awareness.  I also post news and information about dyslexia every weekday across most of the social networks to raise awareness and to provide support, encouragement and resources to children and teens with dyslexia. I never turn down a speaking invitation; I jump at any chance to help people understand dyslexia, or to understand the tools and resources available to help those with dyslexia.6. Do you have any encouraging words for us to remember?Answer: Each and every one of you has special talents or gifts. Continue to work on your assignments and tutoring of course, but make sure you take the time to recognize and nurture your own unique skills and talents. Focus on them and build on them. Those are what will make you extraordinary.

I have a new favorite audience: the children of Camp Delafield, a camp designed specifically for students who have dyslexia, operated by+Dyslexia Institute of Indiana. I’ve had the opportunity to speak to several groups, but none compare to these bright, inquisitive young children, many of whom are newly diagnosed but optimistic and planning for an extraordinary future. All of the kids had superb questions and comments. Here are a few questions I was asked to address followed by my answers:

1. What coping mechanisms help you deal with your dyslexia while in school? Answer: I’m a big fan of high tech, so I’m always on the lookout for good assistive technology. My favorite tool by far and the one I use the most is my Livescribe pen. I have trouble keeping up when I take notes in class but this pen saves me. (I then described how the pen works, and the kids were very excited about this incredible technology).

2. Have you dealt with any bullying because of your dyslexia?
Answer: I used to get beaten up when I was younger for being different or “stupid”, but even when I was little I knew that the problems lay in the bullies, not in me. I wasn’t stupid; they were the ones who were not informed. All that bullying made me want to help other kids and raise awareness about dyslexia. I started the Dyslexic Kids support group for children and teens with dyslexia so that we could encourage each other and remind each other that there’s nothing wrong with us. In fact, we are better than just OK. I like to say that we have a learning advantage that most public schools just aren’t advanced enough to handle!

3. How or when did you learn about your dyslexia, and how did you feel? 
Answer: My parents had me tested when I was young, no thanks to my school (my school refused to test me until third grade) because my parents knew there was a chance I had dyslexia. My father has it, and since it’s genetic, my parents were watching for the signs. At first it seemed to me that dyslexia was a bit negative because it caused difficulty for me in school, but as I’ve gotten older I’ve discovered the really cool gifts that come with dyslexia. For example, big picture thinking, problem solving, creativity, the ability to see things differently and my talents in engineering and technology are all gifts I wouldn’t trade for the world! My father who is also dyslexic works with NASA and a huge percentage of his coworkers have dyslexia so I’ll be in good company as an engineer. Follow-up question: When and where are you going to college? Answer: I’ll be graduating from high school in two years. There are a few colleges I’m considering.

4. How has your dyslexia made you a stronger person?
Answer: I would never have had the courage to start a global support network if dyslexia hadn’t forced me to do it. Now, I’m comfortable with public speaking, debating, teaching, advocating for myself and others, and working with new technologies.

5. How do you now spread the word for dyslexia and yourself?
Answer: I host an annual dyslexia conference in Fort Wayne via the Dyslexic Kids organization. It’s the only dyslexia conference in northeast Indiana! This year the mayor will be involved and will issue a proclamation declaring the second Saturday in October to be dyslexia awareness day so that will help increase press coverage and awareness.  I also post news and information about dyslexia every weekday across most of the social networks to raise awareness and to provide support, encouragement and resources to children and teens with dyslexia. I never turn down a speaking invitation; I jump at any chance to help people understand dyslexia, or to understand the tools and resources available to help those with dyslexia.

6. Do you have any encouraging words for us to remember?
Answer: Each and every one of you has special talents or gifts. Continue to work on your assignments and tutoring of course, but make sure you take the time to recognize and nurture your own unique skills and talents. Focus on them and build on them. Those are what will make you extraordinary.

What a great #C4 conference! There were over 400 enthusiastic teachers all anxious to learn ways to improve the learning environment of their students through technology. It’s always invigorating for me to present to a group that is eager to find out about ways to help their students with dyslexia! We talked about some incredible assistive technologies and learning tools. For one of the handouts, go tohttp://dyslexickids.net and click on Assistive Tech.

Exciting week! Tomorrow I’ll be speaking at a conference about a variety of assistive technologies that help students with dyslexia. On Wednesday, I’ll be speaking about a wide range of issues to a group of parents and students who have dyslexia. If you’re in the Indianapolis area, I hope to see you at one of these events!
The Kickstarter campaign to bring back Reading Rainbow ended yesterday.  The campaign reached several times its goal and became the 5th most funded Kickstarter campaign in history.http://www.forbes.com/sites/amitchowdhry/2014/07/03/reading-rainbow-closes-kickstarter-crowdfunding-campaign-at-over-5-4-million/

The Kickstarter campaign to bring back Reading Rainbow ended yesterday.  The campaign reached several times its goal and became the 5th most funded Kickstarter campaign in history.
http://www.forbes.com/sites/amitchowdhry/2014/07/03/reading-rainbow-closes-kickstarter-crowdfunding-campaign-at-over-5-4-million/

What do you think of these alternative storytelling methods? Would they be helpful or harmful to people with dyslexia?http://mashable.com/2014/07/01/rewriting-storytelling/?utm_cid=mash-com-Tw-main-link

What do you think of these alternative storytelling methods? Would they be helpful or harmful to people with dyslexia?
http://mashable.com/2014/07/01/rewriting-storytelling/?utm_cid=mash-com-Tw-main-link

This is a fascinating study about the willingness of children to trust written words more than verbal statements.http://www.popsci.com/blog-network/kinderlab/want-fool-kid-put-it-writing?src=SOC&dom=tw

This is a fascinating study about the willingness of children to trust written words more than verbal statements.
http://www.popsci.com/blog-network/kinderlab/want-fool-kid-put-it-writing?src=SOC&dom=tw

On July 8th, I will be doing a presentation at the Carmel Clay School # C4 conference. My presentation will be about assistive technology available for people with dyslexia.
I will be visiting with my grandparents for a week. I’ll be back on June 30.
I’ve posted this before, but it bears repeating.

I’ve posted this before, but it bears repeating.

Children with dyslexia are quite creative and often enjoy playing with Legos. Now, Lego has taken creativity to a new level with their new sets: http://mashable.com/2014/06/19/lego-fusion-hands-on/?utm_cid=mash-com-Tw-main-link

Children with dyslexia are quite creative and often enjoy playing with Legos. Now, Lego has taken creativity to a new level with their new sets: http://mashable.com/2014/06/19/lego-fusion-hands-on/?utm_cid=mash-com-Tw-main-link

A great way to explain why listening to audiobooks is a valid method of learning.

A great way to explain why listening to audiobooks is a valid method of learning.

You have Dyslexia?! But You’re So Sarmt!
by Ket Graves (Blank-Muse) on DeviantART: http://blank-muse.deviantart.com/
You have Dyslexia?! But You’re So Sarmt!
by Ket Graves (Blank-Muse) on DeviantART: http://blank-muse.deviantart.com/