October is Dyslexia Awareness Month

October is Dyslexia Awareness Month. At least 10% of students are affected by dyslexia. Please help raise awareness by talking to your friends, relatives, neighbors, coworkers and others about dyslexia! 

I’ll be addressing different topics each day this month. Many thanks to all of you for your suggestions! 

I’ll kick things off by reminding you of the information and free resources available on http://dyslexickids.net/. At DyslexicKids.net, you’ll find a free interactive eBook downloadable through iTunes (click on the “Resources” tab), you can sign up for free tutoring, join a support group for children and teens with dyslexia, and learn more about dyslexia.

Dyslexia Conference from 2:00 - 5:00 on October 12 in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Free and open to the public. Speakers will be from 2:00 - 4:00 in the Globe Room of the main library; assistive technology hands-on demonstrations will be from 4:00 - 5:00 in the Young Adults conference room.

Dyslexia Conference from 2:00 - 5:00 on October 12 in Fort Wayne, Indiana. Free and open to the public. Speakers will be from 2:00 - 4:00 in the Globe Room of the main library; assistive technology hands-on demonstrations will be from 4:00 - 5:00 in the Young Adults conference room.

"It is possible to turn dyslexia into a positive rather than a negative. I learned to focus on the things I was good at and delegate other tasks, a skill that set me in good stead to develop the whole Virgin Group. Having dyslexia means having to trust others to help you with tasks or do them on your behalf – this ability to let go is vital for entrepreneurs." ~Richard Branson, famous dyslexic

"It is possible to turn dyslexia into a positive rather than a negative. I learned to focus on the things I was good at and delegate other tasks, a skill that set me in good stead to develop the whole Virgin Group. Having dyslexia means having to trust others to help you with tasks or do them on your behalf – this ability to let go is vital for entrepreneurs." ~Richard Branson, famous dyslexic

Students with dyslexia often need accommodations in order to complete the same assignments as other students. But what accommodations should you request?
Keep in mind that accommodations do not alter the content of assignments, give students an unfair advantage, or change what a test measures. They simply make it possible for students with dyslexia to show what they know.
Here are a few possible accommodations taken from an article by NCLD (http://www.ncld.org/students-disabilities/accommodations-education/accommodations-include-iep-504-students-ld).

Students with dyslexia often need accommodations in order to complete the same assignments as other students. But what accommodations should you request?

Keep in mind that accommodations do not alter the content of assignments, give students an unfair advantage, or change what a test measures. They simply make it possible for students with dyslexia to show what they know.

Here are a few possible accommodations taken from an article by NCLD (http://www.ncld.org/students-disabilities/accommodations-education/accommodations-include-iep-504-students-ld).

Set aside an hour and watch the film “Embracing Dyslexia” here:
http://www.embracingdyslexia.com/

How to be a dyslexia-friendly school

Interesting article about discovering what motivates students, particularly those with dyslexia who are often less motivated to read. 
"By becoming aware that not all of our students/children will be motivated by the same things, we will keep our minds open and, hopefully, will keep ourselves from boxing them in and negatively and incorrectly labeling our students/children. When we help them explore what motivates them by asking questions and providing opportunities to test different options, we empower them.”http://www.readinghorizons.com/blog/post/2012/11/20/Discovering-What-Motivates-Each-Individual-Student.aspx

Interesting article about discovering what motivates students, particularly those with dyslexia who are often less motivated to read. 

"By becoming aware that not all of our students/children will be motivated by the same things, we will keep our minds open and, hopefully, will keep ourselves from boxing them in and negatively and incorrectly labeling our students/children. When we help them explore what motivates them by asking questions and providing opportunities to test different options, we empower them.”

http://www.readinghorizons.com/blog/post/2012/11/20/Discovering-What-Motivates-Each-Individual-Student.aspx

I know nothing about their program, but I like the video and message! We need to change our perceptions about dyslexia!